Slow artistic movement – Winnipeg Free Press

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At the intersection of the beautiful lie and the ugly truth, you might find Dan Hawksworth, pen in hand.

A self-taught illustrator, Hawksworth explores the realm of the imagination after completing his day job as a computer specialist.

“Art is a way to communicate and to do something self-fulfilling,” said the North Kildonan resident. “Making pen and ink, there is a meditative quality. It is the art of slow. It will take time for this to happen.”

His latest exhibition, Into the Nexus, runs March 4-16 at cre8ery (125 Adelaide St.).

Exploring otherworldly scenes and themes of reality and perception, Hawksworth draws inspiration from sci-fi, fantasy, macabre and gothic with elements of steampunk and Lovecraftian horror, as well as artists such as Swiss painter HR Giger and cartoonist Jack Kirby.

“Most of the pieces have to be further refinement from my last show (2019 Nexus of Realities), the continued exploration of my artistic skills and the limits of my imagination,” said Hawksworth. “It seems to resonate with me, and I continue on this path.”

Hawksworth’s latest work pays close attention to detail and craftsmanship that the Miles Macdonell Collegiate alumnus has spent most of the last decade perfecting.

“It’s just past time,” he added. “Eventually you favor certain pens and learn to speak using your tools. It just comes down to a little more depth, both using more focus on the plains, but also in depth trying to to imbue what is in the image a little more with life or presence. “

Working with ink gives Hawksworth the freedom to pick up a piece when and where the weather permits.

“It’s a critical factor, even more lately,” he said. “It’s handy. I’m lucky my mount gives me that portability, the ability to just pick it up and draw for a few minutes and then put it aside.”

While Hawksworth primarily worked with black ink, he has recently started experimenting with color again.

“In the past, my use of color was, in hindsight, way too bold,” he said. “So I tried to learn and approach things with a more subtle hand, using color to add an element of otherworldly detail or a factor in that depth, to give that illusion of depth. “

Into the Nexus runs March 4-16. Cre8ery is open Tuesday to Friday from noon to 6 p.m. and Saturday from noon to 5 p.m.

For more information, visit cre8ery.com/portfolio/intothenexus/

At the intersection of the beautiful lie and the ugly truth, you might find Dan Hawksworth, pen in hand.

A self-taught illustrator, Hawksworth explores the realm of the imagination after completing his day job as a computer specialist.

“Art is a way to communicate and to do something self-fulfilling,” said the North Kildonan resident. “Making pen and ink, there is a meditative quality. It is the art of slow. It will take time for this to happen.”

His last exhibition, In the Nexus, takes place March 4-16 at cre8ery (125 Adelaide St.).

Exploring otherworldly scenes and themes of reality and perception, Hawksworth draws inspiration from sci-fi, fantasy, macabre and gothic with elements of steampunk and Lovecraftian horror, as well as artists such as Swiss painter HR Giger and cartoonist Jack Kirby.

“Most of the pieces have to be further refinement from my last show (2019 Nexus of Realities), continuing to explore my artistic skills and the limits of my imagination, “said Hawksworth.” It seems to resonate with me, and I continue to do so. ”

Hawksworth’s latest work pays close attention to detail and craftsmanship that the Miles Macdonell Collegiate alumnus has spent most of the last decade perfecting.

“It’s just past time,” he added. “Eventually you favor certain pens and learn to speak using your tools. It just comes down to a little more depth, both using more focus on the plains, but also in depth trying to to imbue what is in the image a little more with life or presence. ”

Working with ink gives Hawksworth the freedom to pick up a piece when and where the weather permits.

“It’s a critical factor, even more lately,” he said. “It’s handy. I’m lucky my mount gives me that portability, the ability to just pick it up and draw for a few minutes and then put it aside.”

While Hawksworth primarily worked with black ink, he has recently started experimenting with color again.

“In the past, my use of color was, in hindsight, way too bold,” he said. “So I tried to learn and approach things with a more subtle hand, using color to add an element of otherworldly detail or a factor in that depth, to give that illusion of depth. ”

In the Nexus from March 4 to 16. Cre8ery is open Tuesday to Friday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

For more information visit cre8ery.com/portfolio/intothenexus/

Sheldon birnie

Sheldon birnie
Community journalist

Sheldon Birnie is the Herald reporter / photographer. The author of Missing Like Teeth: An Oral History of Winnipeg Underground Rock (1990-2001), his writings have been published in journals and online platforms across Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom Mari and a father of two young children, Sheldon enjoys playing guitar and recreational hockey when he can find the time. Email him at [email protected] Call him at 204-697-7112

Christopher S. Washington